Democratic Congresswoman Floats Very BOLD Reparations Proposal

By Alan Hume | Friday, 12 April 2024 11:10 PM
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In a recent episode of the Black Lawyers Podcast, Representative Jasmine Crockett of Texas voiced her support for a unique proposal: exempting African Americans from paying taxes as a form of reparations.

The Democratic congresswoman, however, acknowledged that this approach might not benefit the less affluent members of the community, who, as she pointed out, "aren't really paying taxes in the first place."

The podcast's host, attorney Jehan Carter, initiated the conversation by asking Crockett about her stance on reparations. Carter highlighted the complexity of implementing a program that would financially compensate those whose ancestors were affected by slavery.

In response, Crockett emphasized the need for further research. She argued that any reparations plan would need to be uniformly applied across the nation to prevent people from flocking to specific states to claim their reparations. She warned, "everybody's gonna run to whichever state and be like, 'Yo, I need mine.'"

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Crockett then shared an alternative proposal she had recently encountered, although she could not recall the exact source. "One of the things they propose is black folk not having to pay taxes for a certain amount of time," she elaborated. This approach, she suggested, could be less controversial than direct payments, as it would allow individuals to retain more of their income.

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However, Crockett also noted that traditional reparations might still be more beneficial. She argued that African Americans are owed not only for the labor that was stolen but also for the systemic disadvantages they have faced. "The fact is we end up being so far behind," she stated.

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Crockett further explained that a tax exemption might not help those who are already struggling and not paying taxes. "If you do the no tax thing," she said, "for people that are already say, struggling and not really paying taxes in the first place."

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Carter chimed in, suggesting that these individuals might prefer direct payments from the government.

Despite their discussion, both Crockett and Carter conceded that it would likely be some time before any form of reparations could be proposed to federal and state leaders.

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