SCOTUS: Lib Hating Justice Cause Confidence In Court To Sink

By Seth Cutler | Saturday, 25 June 2022 15:00
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Confidence in the Supreme Court has struck a record low among the public, according to poll findings reported Thursday.

Twenty-five percent of citizens asked said they have a "great deal" or "quite a lot" of trust in the Supreme Court, which is down 11% since 2021, when the same survey showed 36% of survey takers trusted the court, according to Gallup. The previous overall confidence low was 30% in 2014.

The court, which holds a 6-3 conservative majority, has lost support primarily among Democrats and independents in the past year, the Gallup survey showed. Confidence from Republicans increased by 2 percentage points, from 37% to 39%. The decrease in confidence from Democrats saw the biggest change, decreasing from 30% to 13% between 2021 and 2022. Confidence among independents dropped 15 percentage points from 40% to 25%.

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The latest survey was administered between June 1-20 and polled 1,015 adults through cellphones and landlines, all aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and Washington, D.C., with a 4-point margin of error. The numbers were selected using random digit dialing.

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The study came out soon before the Supreme Court is expected to publish a decision in the abortion case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization from Mississippi and follows a leaked draft ruling signaling the high court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade.

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The court has recently released rulings on other hot topics, including gun rights and religion. In the gun rights ruling, the court struck down a concealed carry law in New York. Earlier this week, the court ruled that Maine cannot exclude religious schools from tuition assistance programs.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor said she hopes the court can win back the support of the people.

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“We have to have continuing faith in the court system and our system of government,” Sotomayor said, according to the New York Times, “to regain the public’s confidence that we — as a court, as an institution — have not lost our way.”

The Supreme Court is expected to publish one of its most significant rulings at a time when public confidence in the institution has never been lower. Should the conservative-leaning court decides to overturn Roe v. Wade, it is unclear whether that decision would further damage the institution's reputation among Americans or perhaps improve it if Americans agree with the court's reasoning. Invalidating Roe would allow state governments to decide whether abortion is legal or illegal in their state.

The public may have already taken the Supreme Court's view on the abortion issue into account, with its decision on the Texas law and the leaked draft majority opinion on the Mississippi law. But an actual, rather than hypothetical or expected, decision may have more potency in shifting Americans' views of the court.

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