Fundamental Reading: Why Are Americans Abandoning The Bible In The Millions?

Written By BlabberBuzz | Friday, 22 April 2022 05:15
16 debators
1771

The American Bible Society has discovered a shocking drop in Bible reading and engagement. The numbers are indeed discouraging — but what's going on? And amid the unfortunate statistics, are there any bright spots?

There has been an “unprecedented drop” in the number of Bible users in the United States since last year, according to a report released by the American Bible Society.

Christian Post reporter Ryan Foley joins Billy Hallowell to consult his coverage of the subject, while also breaking down some of the pressing questions about the most important and consequential book in history.

Listen to the engaging discussion (and subscribe to the podcast): "The Christian Post Podcast" takes you behind the headlines of the biggest faith, culture, and political headlines of the week. In 15 minutes or less, Christian Post staff writers and editors will help you navigate and understand what’s driving each story, the issues at play — and why it all matters.

 LAZINESS OR INNOVATIVE? AMERICA LEADING THE WORLD IN WORKING FROM HOMEbell_image

The 2022 State of the Bible report, released Wednesday, based its findings on responses collected from a survey of 2,598 U.S. adults completed in January. The 12th annual report asked Americans a medley of questions about their Bible use and their thoughts on its role in society.

A preface to the report also highlights changes in the percentage of Bible users in the U.S. over time. The American Bible Society defines Bible users as “those who use the Bible at least 3-4 times each year on their own, outside of a church setting.”

 'THOUGHTS & PRAYERS NO LONGER ENOUGH' AFTER BUFFALO MASSACRE, SAYS CONGRESSIONAL BLACK CAUCUSbell_image

After reaching a high of 53% in 2014, the share of Bible users among the U.S. adult population unfailingly remained between 48% and 51%. Just last year, 50% of Americans were Bible users. However, in 2022, Bible users in the U.S. accounted for just 39% of the adult population, the lowest in more than a decade.

 WATCH: ROOKIE PRESS SEC'S FIRST TIME ON STAGEbell_image

The State of the Bible report explained the 11% decrease as an “unprecedented drop in the percentage of Bible users in the United States.” When applied to the U.S. population as a whole, the figure suggests that the number of Bible users in the U.S. dropped from 128 million in 2021 to 103 million in 2022.

The group labeled Bible users consisted of Americans who read the Bible outside of the church as infrequently as three to four times a year to those who use the Bible daily. Ten percent of U.S. adults use the Bible daily, while 4% use it four to six times a week, 7% consult it two to three times a week, 5% read the Bible once a week, and 7% read it once a month.

 WHAT DOES THE $40B TO UKRAINE MEAN FOR AVERAGE AMERICANS?bell_image

More than half (60%) of Americans use the Bible less than three to four times a year. A plurality (40%) of those questioned never read the Bible on their own, while 12% read it less than once a year and 8% look at it once or twice a year.

 FORMULA CRISIS: PARENTS URGE BIDEN TO IMPORT FORMULA SO BABIES DON'T STARVEbell_image

The State of the Bible report also reveals what the American Bible Society describes as a “major decrease in Scripture Engagement,” which is portrayed as “consistent interaction with the Bible that shapes people’s choices and transforms their relationships with God, self, and others.” The average number of Scripture-engaged Americans dropped from 64 million in 2021 to 49 million in 2022. At the same time, the estimated number of Bible disengaged Americans rose from 100 million last year to 145 million this year.

The survey also inquired about respondents’ Bible reading habits. The overwhelming majority (78%) of those surveyed implied that their Bible reading “stayed the same” over the past year, as 13% reported an increase in Bible reading and the remaining 10% saw a decrease in their Bible reading.

When asked “how do you think our country would be without the Bible,” specifically referring to a hypothetical scenario where “nobody read the Bible at all,” a plurality of respondents (45%) indicated that they thought the U.S. would be “worse off” without the Bible. This is a noticeable decrease from last year when 54% of those surveyed believed that the U.S. would be “worse off” without the Bible.

MEMES


FLIPBOOKS