Did Malaysia Cover Up MH370 Crash? British Engineer's Theory Sparks Debate

Written By BlabberBuzz | Monday, 06 December 2021 16:45
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A British engineer claims he is "quite convinced" he has located the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.

In 2014, a Malaysia Airlines plane carrying 239 people went missing while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Richard Godfrey has been experimenting with new tracking equipment in an attempt to solve one of history's greatest aviation mysteries. He claims the device, which uses radio signals as "tripwires," assisted him in locating the jet, which he claims is 13,000 feet below the ocean's surface.

The plane lies around 1,200 miles west of Perth, Australia, near the base of the Broken Ridge, an underwater plateau with a volcano and ravines in the southern Indian Ocean, according to Godfrey. He told Australia's 7News that he believes the plane crashed as a result of a "hijacking" by pilot Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, which he described as a "act of terrorism." The pilot "decided to reroute his aircraft and make it disappear in one of the most remote regions on the planet," according to the British.

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The new tracking technology, known as the Weak Signal Propagation Reporter (WSPR), is described as a "bunch of tripwires that work in every direction across the horizon to the other side of the planet," according to the engineer. Godfrey integrated the new technology with data from the plane's satellite communications system. "Both methods can be used together to detect, identify, and locate MH370 during its flight path into the Southern Indian Ocean," he stated.

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According to the inventor, the new tracking gadget, dubbed the Weak Signal Propagation Reporter (WSPR), is a "bunch of tripwires that work in every direction across the horizon to the other side of the earth." Godfrey combined data from the plane's satellite communications system with the new technology. "Both technologies can be used in conjunction to detect, identify, and locate MH370 as it flew into the Southern Indian Ocean," he said.

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The area was, however, included in the 2016 search, according to 7News.

Last month, Godfrey addressed allegations that pilot Shah simulated a flight into the Indian Ocean at home, "to the point of fuel exhaustion." "The study of the Microsoft Flight simulator data found on Zaharie Shah's huge home flight computer set up by Victor Iannello and Yves Guillaume is a smoking gun," he stated. “Zaharie Shah simulated a single flight from Kuala Lumpur via the Malacca Strait to the point of fuel exhaustion in the southern Indian Ocean.”

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Since 2014, 33 pieces of wreckage have been discovered in six countries, including South Africa and Madagascar, indicating that the airliner crashed into the Indian Ocean, according to experts. The most recent full-scale search for MH370, conducted by US robotics company Ocean Infinity in 2018, covered approximately 50,000 square miles but yielded no results. The Weak Signal Propagation Reporter (WSPR) is now being used to calculate the final location of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 before it vanished.

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WSPR is a global network of radio waves that allows planes to be monitored by setting off invisible "digital tripwires" that indicate their location. Extensive testing of new technology that tracks previous data of radio signals bouncing off planes has led scientists to believe it could narrow down the search region. Godfrey likens the system, which was launched in 2009, to a web of invisible detectors that track movement in the clouds.

"Imagine walking a prairie with invisible tripwires across the entire area and moving back and forth across the length and breadth," he told The New York Times.

"Each step you take causes you to step on specific tripwires, which allows us to track you down to the intersection of the disrupted tripwires. We'll be able to follow your progress over the grassland."

Following the successful WSPR experiments, the Ocean Infinity team has stated that they are willing to resume their hunt."Imagine walking a prairie with invisible tripwires across the entire area and moving back and forth across the length and breadth," he told The New York Times. "Each step you take causes you to step on specific tripwires, which allows us to track you down to the intersection of the disrupted tripwires. We'll be able to follow your progress over the grassland." Following the successful WSPR experiments, the Ocean Infinity team has stated that they are willing to resume their hunt.

"We are always interested in renewing the search," a spokesman said, "whether as a result of fresh information or new technology." After taking off from Kuala Lumpur International Airport, MH370 vanished from radar and made an unexpected U-turn from its planned flight path. Some investigators believe the plane's captain made a series of zig-zagging motions to confuse air traffic controllers and avoid radar systems seven years later.

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