'Bigger than bin Laden': Iran expert hails Qassim Soleimani's killing as 'massive blow to the regime'

Written By BlabberBuzz | Source: The Washington Examiner | Friday, 03 January 2020 01:12

Iran expert Mark Dubowitz did not mince words when trying to convey the enormity of the killing of Iranian terrorist commander Qassim Soleimani, declaring the news "bigger than bin Laden" and predicting it would be a "massive blow to the regime.

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Dubowitz, CEO of the Foundation of Defense of Democracies, was initially skeptical of reports that Soleimani had been killed. But once more confirmation started coming in, he took to Twitter in an attempt to convey the magnitude of the event.

"If it’s true Suleimani is dead, this is bigger than bin-Laden," he wrote. "Bigger than [Hezbollah's Imad] Mugniyeh. Bigger than [Islamic state leader Abu Bakr] Baghdadi. For two decades, Suleimani has been the most powerul, savvy & effective terrorist on the planet. He's enjoyed full backing of powerful terrorist state. Irreplacable."

Trying to draw an analogy to the United States, he also wrote, "If your view is Suleimani can easily be replaced, you know nothing about how he has completely dominated [Quds Force] & [Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps] for 20 yrs. Ops, intel, foreign relations, political warfare, strategy. It’s like losing your [Joint Chief of Staff] commander, CIA director & foreign minister — all at once."

He predicted, "I imagine lots of Iranians will also wake up in a few hours with smiles on their faces. This is a massive blow to the regime."

If it’s true Suleimani is dead, this is bigger than bin-Laden. Bigger than Mugniyeh. Bigger than Baghdadi. For two decades, Suleimani has been the most powerful, savvy & effective terrorist on the planet. He’s enjoyed full backing of powerful terrorist state. Irreplaceable.

— Mark Dubowitz (@mdubowitz) January 3, 2020

If your view is Suleimani can easily be replaced, you know nothing about how he has completely dominated QF & IRGC for 20 yrs. Ops, intel, foreign relations, political warfare, strategy. It’s like losing your JSOC commander, CIA director & foreign minister — all at once.

— Mark Dubowitz (@mdubowitz) January 3, 2020

I imagine lots of Iranians will also wake up in a few hours with smiles on their faces. This is a massive blow to the regime. And they too will have to brace themselves for what comes next. #IranProtests#FreeIran2020https://t.co/QXxPIRys1T

— Mark Dubowitz (@mdubowitz) January 3, 2020

Sen. Chris Murphy: Qasem Soleimani ‘Most Significant Leader The United States Has Ever Assassinated’

This article was sourced from The Daily Caller Politics

Democratic Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy said Thursday that the assassination of top Iranian Gen. Qasem Soleimani could be the “most significant” one ever accomplished by America.

The leader of Iran’s elite Quds Force was killed during an airstrike Thursday ordered by President Donald Trump near the Baghdad, Iraq, airport, the Pentagon said in a statement. Soleimani was “actively developing plans” to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq, the statement read.

“This could be the most significant foreign political leader the United States has ever assassinated …” Murphy said when speaking to MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow on “The Rachel Maddow Show.” Murphy is a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

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He added that “this a very, very dangerous moment” and that there is the possibility of America getting “into a conflict in the region.” Murphy noted that the United States is “very careful about these kinds of things” because of potential “consequences.”

Murphy continued on to say that “you can’t do this without congressional authorization.” He also tweeted wondering if America assassinated “second most powerful person in Iran” without congressional approval.

The tweet was met with backlash from Republican Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse, who called it “drunk partisanship.”

Following the assassination, Washington Times reporter Mike Glenn wrote that he wasn’t “sad that he [Soleimani] got greased.” Glenn noted that the Quds Force leader was “directly responsible” for many American military deaths in Iraq.

Reporter Yashar Ali tweeted about the “extraordinary” power that Soleimani often displayed, even though “Iran has an elected president and foreign minister.” Ali included a screenshot of a 2011 article from The Guardian reporting on a text message Soleimani sent then-Director of the Central Intelligence Agency David Petraeus.

“General Petraeus, you should know that I, Qassem Suleimani, control the policy for Iran with respect to Iraq, Lebanon, Gaza, and Afghanistan,” the text message began.

Soleimani’s death will escalate tensions in the Middle East. The Quds Force have provided supported terrorist groups for years.

“At the direction of the President, the U.S. military has taken decisive defensive action to protect U.S. personnel abroad by killing Qasem Soleimani, the head of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps-Quds Force, a U.S.-designated Foreign Terrorist Organization,” the Pentagon said.

Leader of Kataeb Hezbollah Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis was also reportedly killed in the drone strike. Kataeb Hezbollah, an Iraqi paramilitary group, attempted to break into the U.S. embassy in Baghdad Dec. 31.

Soleimani directed the embassy attack, the Pentagon said. (RELATED: Militiamen Withdraw From Attack On US Embassy In Baghdad)

Soleimani's death was not an act of war but an act of deterrence

This article was sourced from The Washington Examiner

Qassim Soleimani, the commander of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps responsible for hundreds of U.S. deaths in the Middle East, has reportedly been killed by a targeted U.S.

airstrike in Baghdad.

The Defense Department has yet to confirm the news. But if it is true, Soleimani’s death is an important retaliatory move against Iran, a dangerous regime that has spent much of the past decade probing for U.S. weaknesses.

A few online ideologues are decrying Soleimani’s death as a dangerous, unnecessary act of war and an escalation of aggression that could have dire consequences for the United States in the days to come.

By what legal authority can US forces kill the head of Iran's Quds Force? Does @realDonaldTrump realize the import of this?

— Barbara Slavin (@barbaraslavin1) January 3, 2020

Reasonable people can disagree on the wisdom, in principle, of targeting Soleimani. But no one should be under any illusion that the Trump admin is prepared to handle the backlash that will follow if this is true. This is a network that has the region wired and cells in the West. https://t.co/8pj4S654t7

— Ned Price (@nedprice) January 3, 2020

The Iranian Supreme Leader will undoubtedly react to Soleimani’s death in a significant manner. There could be major cyber attacks against the U.S., or even covert operations around the globe or within the country. And the Trump administration will now need to develop a coherent strategy to contain the damage within Iraq and the surrounding regions.

But to suggest this assassination — if that is what it was — was not warranted is asinine. The man was a criminal and a terrorist with the blood of hundreds of U.S. soldiers on his hands. This was an act of deterrence long overdue. The world is a better place without him.

Soleimani’s death was not an act of war; it was merely a warranted defensive response to Iranian aggression. In the past few months, Iran has attacked U.S. allies in the Middle East, including NATO vessels and a Saudi Arabian petrol facility, and it has targeted U.S. military positions in Iraq with rockets repeatedly. The regime wants the U.S. out of the region and it has been pushing the envelope to see how much the we would take. By taking out Soleimani, arguably one of Iran’s most important military figures, President Trump had made it clear that the U.S. will not tolerate Iran’s aggression any longer.

Iran will try to retaliate, but its options will be limited, and now the Supreme Leader knows there will be a significant risk if he does make a move. Let’s hope this is the end of it.

This article was sourced from The Washington Examiner

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