Hollywood Actor Wants To Change Masculinity

Written By BlabberBuzz | Friday, 26 November 2021 05:15

“We need to fix men's behavior,” Benedict Cumberbatch said, calling for the end of toxic masculinity. The Sherlock star made the remarks while promoting his new film, Power of the Dog, which is based on a Thomas Savage novel. Cumberbatch, who plays charming rancher Phil Burbank, who inspires terror and awe in people around him, spoke about the need of examining such themes in a promotional interview.

He told Sky News: “We need to fix the behavior of men. You have to kind of lift the lid on the engine a little bit.”

“I think it's ever-relevant, and in a world that's questioning and ripping into and finally pointing out the inadequacies of the status quo and the patriarchy, it's even more important.”

“You get this sort of rebellion aspect, this denial, this sort of childish defensive position of 'not all men are bad. No, we just have to shut up and listen.”

“There is not enough recognition of abuse, there's not enough recognition of disadvantages and, at the same time, somewhere along the line - maybe not now, but somewhere along the line - we need to do maybe what the film does as well, which is examine the reason behind the oppressive behavior to fix the men.”

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 AZ GOVERNOR SUES BIDEN FOR WITHHOLDING CASH FOR NON-MASKED SCHOOLSbell_image

It follows his co-star Kirsten Dunst's admission that she 'separated' herself from Cumberbatch on set.

Because Cumberbatch remained primarily in character as the scary Phil, the Spider-Man actress claimed she stayed a safe distance during filming. She told the Radio Times in an interview: “We didn't talk at all during the filming unless we were out to dinner on a weekend, all together, or playing with our kids.”

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However, she also added: “He's so sweet. And he's so British. Polite British, you know? I was like, 'I can't talk to you!”

The Oscar-nominated actor is speaking about toxic masculinity, a theme that runs through his latest film, Power Of The Dog. He is most known for TV programs such as Sherlock and Patrick Melrose, as well as his depiction of Doctor Strange in the Marvel Universe. Cumberbatch plays Phil Burbank, a masochistic rancher who privately represses his urges while outwardly tormenting those closest to him, including his brother's new wife, in this adaption of Thomas Savage's novel set in 1920s Montana (played by Kirsten Dunst).

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 WATCH: BILL MAHER'S MASK JOKE INFURIATES LIBTARDSbell_image

Perhaps most interestingly, this view on masculinity is directed by Jane Campion, an Oscar-winning director known for films like The Piano, The Portrait Of A Lady, and Bright Star, which focus on the feminine experience. Power Of The Dog is her first feature picture in 12 years, as well as her first featuring a male lead. Cumberbatch says, "She's always been a heroine of mine." "When I was younger, The Piano was a seismic film for me, and I fully fell under its spell."

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"She's just a great director and the sensitivity and sensibility is needed in this to really crack Philip, you couldn't imagine a better director for that."

Although the film is set a century ago, Cumberbatch believes its exploration of masculinity is just as relevant today. "You get this sort of rebellion aspect [from men today], this denial, this sort of childish defensive position of 'not all men are bad, but no, we just have to shut up and listen," he says.

"There is not enough recognition of abuse, there's not enough recognition of disadvantages and, at the same time, somewhere along the line - maybe not now, but somewhere along the line - we need to do maybe what the film does as well, which is examine the reason behind the oppressive behavior."

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