One Thing Americans Don't Want At Their Thanksgiving Table:

Written By BlabberBuzz | Wednesday, 24 November 2021 08:30

Most Americans hope that politics will not be part of the Thanksgiving festivities — though they are split on whether the menu will include a heated debate, a new survey revealed.

In a Quinnipiac University national poll published Monday, 66% of recipients stated they are hoping to avoid talking about politics while visiting family or friends this Thanksgiving, while 21% state they're looking forward to talking about politics.

While 21% stated they are "looking forward" to a political dispute at the turkey table, 68% of Republicans, 66% of Democrats, and 69% of independents state they want politics off-limits.

 CRT BEING TAUGHT IN LA PUBLIC SCHOOLS:bell_image

 CRT BEING TAUGHT IN LA PUBLIC SCHOOLS:bell_image

The poll found 74% announced that heated political debates among family or friends were "not so likely" or "not likely at all" compared with 24% who stated that such discussions were "very likely" or "somewhat likely."

Among Republicans, 76% said talking politics was "not so likely" or "not likely at all," a sentiment that applied to 74% of Democrats and 70% of independents.

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 WATCH: TED CRUZ SLAMS THE NBA FOR LACKING BALLS AGAINST CHINAbell_image

"A heaping serving of political back and forth with your cranberries and stuffing? No way, say Americans, who would far rather feast on the big meal than feud with each other on Turkey Day," Quinnipiac University polling analyst Tim Malloy announced in a statement.

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 STACEY ABRAMS THINKS THE GOVERNOR'S MANSION IS FOR HERbell_image

He continued that "the pandemic nightmare may have brought emotional, and in some cases, financial upheaval to American homes, but it did not chip away at their charitable instincts."

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 KAMALA'S STAFF CONTINUES TO EVAPORATE AS SHE TANKSbell_image

Melissa Whitson, a Professor of Community Psychology at the University of New Haven, announced that many families find it easy to set aside divisive matters for the holiday. She explained that it helps if someone in the family asks everyone to avoid topics they know will lead to dispute.

"Even if someone starts bringing something up, don't feel the need to defend yourself or things like that," Whitson said. "Just change the subject … have other things ready to talk about."

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Whitson said avoiding hot-button topics can be especially difficult for people who feel their identities are under attack by the political beliefs of others.

"We have college students here, if they're going home and they identify as trans or gay or other things where they know their family members aren't approving or approve politics that are directly prejudicial and discriminatory towards them, that can be really difficult," she announced.

According to the survey, 70% stated they intend to give about the same amount to charity as they did last year; 19% say they intend to give more, and 7% say they plan to give less.

The survey taken Nov. 11-15 has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points.

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