Despite A Horrible Economy: Young Americans Feel The Need To Quit Jobs

Written By BlabberBuzz | Friday, 29 October 2021 21:45

While most Americans think that the economy is faltering, almost three-quarters surveyed in a recent Gallup survey think it is an excellent time to find a quality job.

A survey, conducted from Oct. 1-19 with a random sample of 823 adults in all 50 states, discovered that 74% think it is a good time to find a quality job, while roughly the same percentage are dissatisfied with the way things in the nation are going.

According to Gallup, the new record number of those believing it is a good time to find better employment opportunities had remained constant since August when a prior record-setting 72% answered the same thing.

The new numbers are much higher than previous polling, where those optimistic about seeking better work dropped from 68% in January 2020 to just 22% in April of that year as the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns forced massive layoffs.

 AZ GOVERNOR SUES BIDEN FOR WITHHOLDING CASH FOR NON-MASKED SCHOOLSbell_image

 AZ GOVERNOR SUES BIDEN FOR WITHHOLDING CASH FOR NON-MASKED SCHOOLSbell_image

Comparatively, even throughout the pandemic, the numbers never reached the lows of 8% and 10% throughout and after the Great Recession in 2009-2011.

 EDUCATION SECRETARY FACES RESIGNATION CALLSbell_image

 EDUCATION SECRETARY FACES RESIGNATION CALLSbell_image

Americans are wary of the faltering economy with supply chain and labor shortages, and the ripples caused by the pandemic. This led to a sharp rise in inflation, the U.S. Department of Labor reported 11.5 million workers quit their jobs from April to June.

 WATCH: IF THIS STRAW POLL SAYS ANYTHING IT IS BYE BYE LIZ CHENEYbell_image

 WATCH: IF THIS STRAW POLL SAYS ANYTHING IT IS BYE BYE LIZ CHENEYbell_image

Inc. Magazine reported 74% of workers who responded to a LinkedIn poll announced they were "re-thinking" their employment picture after being at home or working remotely during the pandemic.

Others in the survey showed dissatisfaction, burnout, and fear of job loss after pandemic-related business shutdowns and slowdowns.

 SCOTUS TO HEAR CASE AGAINST WOKE-RACIST COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE RULESbell_image

 SCOTUS TO HEAR CASE AGAINST WOKE-RACIST COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE RULESbell_image

Even as the unemployment rate fell from double digits during the height of the pandemic to about 4.8% now, a 13-year record-high inflation rate is causing more and more Americans to place the economy and governmental policies at the top of their concerns.

 WATCH: BILL MAHER'S MASK JOKE INFURIATES LIBTARDSbell_image

 WATCH: BILL MAHER'S MASK JOKE INFURIATES LIBTARDSbell_image

Although economic confidence rose from the -33 rating in April 2020 to a -1 in November 2020, and a +2 in April, it has steadily declined again throughout the summer to -25 in October, with 68% of those polled stating the economy is getting worse, according to the Gallup survey.

The top reasons Americans blame for the eroding confidence in the economy are poor government leadership (21%) and COVID-19 (15%).

According to Gallup, the number of Americans citing any economic issue as the most important facing the country has not been this high since April 2017.

The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus seven percentage points.

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's