Dem Victory In Midterms Just Got Virtually Impossible

Written By BlabberBuzz | Tuesday, 19 October 2021 16:45

Two longtime House Democrats declared on Monday that they will not attempt reelection, creating more open seats as the party faces tough political headwinds in next year's midterm elections.

Departing Reps. Mike Doyle (Pa.) and David Price (N.C.) both represent districts that are currently Democratic strongholds and, at this point, don't seem prone to fall into GOP hands.

Though many senior members' loss is a potential sign of a party struggling to maintain morale and pass a sweeping agenda in a progressively worsening political environment, recent surveys reveal President Biden's approval rating sagging.

Democrats may have more retirements to be concerned about in the following weeks as other lawmakers choose whether they want to campaign for reelection next year when the party faces an uphill battle to keep command of the House.

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 WATCH: WHOOPI GOLDBERG SLAMS ALL MALES THAT DISCUSS ABORTIONbell_image

Republicans just need to flip a net five seats to win the House majority. After that, decennial redistricting alone could possibly tip the scales in the GOP's favor, particularly while Democrats hold such razor-thin margins of power in Congress.

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 JOHN EASTMAN ALREADY PLEAD THE FIFTH AHEAD OF JAN 6 COMMITTEE APPEARANCEbell_image

History is not in Democrats' favor, either, since the president's party tends to lose seats in midterm elections.

And a large number of further retirements by popular incumbents, particularly in competitive districts, could make it even harder for Democrats next year.

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 NO CHOICE: UNIVERSITIES BANNING STUDENTS WHO DO NOT HAVE BOOSTERbell_image

Another senior Democrat, House Budget Committee Chairman John Yarmuth (Ky.), further declared last week that he will retire before the midterms even though he still expects his district will stay heavily Democratic in redistricting.

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 MUST WATCH: BIDEN'S BEHAVIOR SHOWS JUST HOW LITTLE HE THINKS OF HIS OWN RULESbell_image

That brings the current total of House Democrats trying not to seek reelection to 12, including five who are seeking other offices.

Republicans pounced on the departures of three long-serving Democrats as a sign that the political winds are blowing in the GOP's favor.

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 WHITE HOUSE NOW PLACES BLAME ON OMICRON FOR SUPPLY CHAIN ISSUESbell_image

"Smart Democrats are fleeing Congress as fast as humanly possible because they know Democrats' majority is coming to an end," announced Mike Berg, a spokesman for the National Republican Congressional Committee.

Ian Russell, a former top strategist for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), prophesied that more incumbent lawmakers would make decisions regarding whether to run for reelection as states complete their redistricting work.

"I'm sure members are also keeping an eye on the political weather, trying to divine how 2022 is shaping up," Russell announced.

Russell stated that in his experience, party committees worked hard behind the scenes to convince incumbents in competitive districts to run for reelection since open seats are typically much harder to maintain.

"When I was at DCCC, we'd beg, plead and cajole members in seats like that to run again. It was a huge priority for leadership," Russell stated.

Democrats contend the members who have declared their retirements in recent days will not prove hard to succeed because they hail from blue bastions. The real trouble comes when members in competitive seats start calling it quits.

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