Innovative Or Disgusting? Colorado Bill Will Allow Funerals To Become 'Composting' Ceremonies

Written By BlabberBuzz | Saturday, 17 April 2021 16:30

Colorado is about to offer people the option to turn their human bodies into pounds of soil after death. The process uses little energy and would cost about as much as a cremation. SB21-006 didn’t make it through the session last year because of COVID-19 crisis, thus it is brought back again now. The sponsors have company in other states, with California, Oregon and New York also considering human composting.

Robert Rodriguez, the Democratic Senator of Denver, says on the matter:

“It’s an innovative idea in a state that prides itself on natural beauty and opportunities.”

Robert Rodriguez was raised Catholic, so according to him, it’s not necessarily something he might want to do for himself, yet he believes Coloradans should have a choice. He along with the other sponsors on the bill, like Democratic Representative Brianna Titone of Arvada and GOP Representative Matt Soper of Delta, claim they have heard from people who are excited about this idea.

For instance, Wendy Deboskey, the resident of Denver, says:

“It just seems like a really kind of natural and gentle way to be completely returned to the earth, only on an expedited basis.”

Importantly, the Colorado bill does not allow for the soil of multiple people to be combined without consent, as well as for the soil to be sold or for the soil to be used to grow food for human consumption.

IRAN CONTINUES TO PUSH BUTTONS IN THE GULF

IRAN CONTINUES TO PUSH BUTTONS IN THE GULF

Some in the post-death business are excited to get involved, while others are still weighing the options. Olinger Funeral, Cremation & Cemetery-Crown Hill told the press that it needs more information, however, believes in the importance of giving people choices.

BIDEN ADMIN STAYS STUPID AS THE ENTIRE COUNTRY NEEDS TO GET BACK TO WORK (VIDEO)

BIDEN ADMIN STAYS STUPID AS THE ENTIRE COUNTRY NEEDS TO GET BACK TO WORK (VIDEO)

Death is difficult topic to talk about, for this reason Jamie Sarche with Feldman Mortuary in Denver is grateful to have another reason to start the conversation with people, even if they ultimately don’t end up choosing the human composting method, or in case it doesn’t pass a second House committee and the full House this year. Jamie Sarche, the mortuary’s pre-arranged funeral planning and aftercare director, says:

FAUCI THINKS THE US UNDERCOUNTED THEIR DEAD, DESPITE EVERY EXPERT SAYING OTHERWISE

FAUCI THINKS THE US UNDERCOUNTED THEIR DEAD, DESPITE EVERY EXPERT SAYING OTHERWISE

“Unless they think about it ahead of time, they will get on the path of least resistance at the time of their death. So, their loved ones might choose something that they would never want because they feel pressured to do it because somebody just died.”

Undoubtedly, it would be a big investment for a funeral home or mortuary to take this on, yet Feldman Mortuary is interested in the concept and possibly even contracting out services if they become available.

DEMS PROCEED WITH THEIR POWER GRAB LAWS

DEMS PROCEED WITH THEIR POWER GRAB LAWS

The Natural Funeral in Boulder County is as well interested in being able to offer the discussed service, especially due to the environmental impact, stated Seth Viddal, managing partner. The funeral home will still have other options, like green burials and water cremation, and this would be another possible choice. According to Seth Viddal, their funeral home is already getting requests for the service.

CALIFORNIA MIGHT AS WELL BE FEDERAL PROPERTY WITH ITS HUGE GOVERNMENT BUDGET

CALIFORNIA MIGHT AS WELL BE FEDERAL PROPERTY WITH ITS HUGE GOVERNMENT BUDGET

In Washington, Recompose offers human composting for $5,500, which includes the soil transformation; a memorial service for the family to see the body placed in the vessel; and the options of donating the soil from the bodies to a 700-acre non-profit land trust, the return of the soil to the family or a combination of the two.

For comparison, water cremation at The Natural Funeral in Boulder costs $5,000; while a typical cremation in the Denver-area is about $3,000 - $4,000 with a memorial service, and a green burial with a permanent resting place for someone’s body would start around $10,000.

Recompose's chief executive and founder, Katrina Spade, said she plans to bring Recompose to Colorado if the bill becomes law:

“It’s an added choice to the menu of options when someone dies. It’s a choice, both for the consumer — which I think is really important that we have as many choices as possible for bodies when we die — and it’s also a choice for funeral homes if they decide they want to get involved.”

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