Early Voting Fraud Watch: Election Day Is Next Week, So Why Is Nevada Already Counting Votes?

Written By BlabberBuzz | Sunday, 25 October 2020 14:50

"It is troubling that those trusted to run our elections are going to have to be compelled by the court to follow state law and protect this election," Michael McDonald, chair of the Nevada Republican Party, said in a statement Friday.

"We join President Trump in his fight for transparency and accountability in Nevada's election system."

The lawsuit follows a letter sent to Clark County's election officials this week by the state Republican Party's attorneys describing many of the same accusations, including limitations to its election observers, and threats of legal action if they were not addressed.

Filed early Friday with the state court in Carson City, the Trump campaign's lawsuit follows a months long series of charges from Republicans in Nevada over election procedures.

"Here, simply holding off on the counting of ballots until a determination can be reached on the merits of the pending petitions is no real burden," wrote Trump campaign's attorneys in their application for a temporary restraining order. "Ballots need not be counted until election day and, given the provisions of AB4, are even counted for days after election day."

Republicans had earlier this year positioned an ultimately unsuccessful bid in federal court to block the state's election alterations in response to the pandemic, including Nevada's move to mail ballots to all active voters in the state this year, mentioning concerns over voter fraud.

A decision by a Nevada judge to delay ballot counting in Clark County could significantly hinder results in the battleground state, given Nevada's transfer to a predominantly mail-in-ballot election and the additional steps that processing mail ballots, like proposing so called "mismatched" signatures, introduce to the process of calculating early votes. Nevada also began early in person voting last week and will have polls open on Election Day.

Both in the letter and their lawsuit, Republicans claimed that the Clark County registrar had failed to present a written plan for how the general public could observe the processing of early ballots. They also opposed restrictions on observers in the county's facilities, including blocking their access to "rooms dedicated to resolving ballot issues" or to installing cameras to monitor tabulation remotely, indicating COVID 19 concerns.

In the lawsuit, Republicans also raised objections about how Clark County was handling mail ballots, claiming that county officials "intentionally lowered the tolerance number" on a processing machine leading to fewer rejected signatures.

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's

Start your own discussion or comment on someone else's